Ever seen your students light up when they discover the real-world applications of economics? Perhaps it was a timely news article or the perfect Planet Money episode. However, finding these great resources can be a bit like locating a needle in a haystack.

Good news! With the help of economics educators like you, we’ve scoured the web for the best econ teaching resources and, where possible, paired them with classroom activities.

We'll deliver these resources via a weekly email — full of news articles, videos, and podcasts customized to the topic you’re teaching that week. Just micro for now.

How it works in 3 steps

Fill out a short form. 

With your syllabus in hand, we can be sure to send you the right content at the right time.

Copyright © 2018 Marginal Revolution University. All rights reserved.

We curate custom 
content for your class. 

We've searched high and low for resources that will engage your students: news articles with clicker questions, podcasts, videos, nerdy blog posts, games and more. Check out our working spreadsheet for details. 


You receive one weekly email.

You’ll receive a weekly email with vetted content matched to the topic you’re teaching that week, for free.

Count me in!

Check out a sample email!

This is available to a limited number of beta users. Don't fret if you get waitlisted – we will let you know when we've got a slot for you!

Elasticity: Curated Media

News & Articles

Massive response to sale prompts Build-A-Bear to shut down lines, offer vouchers  
(CNN) 7/12/2018
The "overwhelming" response to a sale at Build-A-Bear prompted the retailer to turn away customers waiting in long lines outside its stores. Ask your students if they can infer anything about elasticity of demand.
Resources: Multiple Choice Questions


Most Netflix users would pay a lot more for their subscription, survey shows 
(Yahoo! Finance 5/15/2018)
Are your students addicted to Netflix? Then this example might resonate with them. While the headline is a bit misleading, you can use the information given in the article about demand at different price points to calculate (a rough) elasticity of demand for Netflix (FYI —  Netflix has around 125M subscribers). You could even create a poll for your class and construct the class’ elasticity of demand for Netflix for a more personal example.


Facts about (Facebook) Friends  (Marginal Revolution) 7/25/2017
An oldie, but a goodie. Does distance make the heart grow fonder? Tyler Cowen provides some stats on social connectedness and links to a working paper on the topic. Transfer of learning, anyone?

Podcasts

An Economist Gets Stoned*
(Planet Money)
What happens to the price of drugs if we legalize them? Well, it depends on elasticity of demand. For more background on the research in this episode, check out Jeffrey Miron’s paper on drug prohibition’s budgetary implications.*No economists were stoned in the making of this podcast. 

Resource: Rebecca Moryll has a class discussion question and a written assignment for this episode at audioecon.com.


Video

Characteristics that Determine Elasticity 
(MJM Foodie)
Using the example of gas to fuel her car, Dr. Mary J. McGlasson gives a quick overview of the contributing factors to whether an individual’s demand for a particular good might be elastic or inelastic. So, is Dr. McGlasson’s demand for gasoline elastic or inelastic?


Elasticity and Slave Redemption 
(MRU)
Slave redemption is one of the starkest examples of unintended consequences that we’ve ever heard of. It drives home the point for students that even when you’re trying to do good in the world, understanding economics, including elasticities, is crucial!

Hey Professor Thaler,

Welcome back to EconInbox — your weekly round-up of the best free and engaging econ teaching resources out there.

This week: elasticity. Students often have trouble with elasticity, especially applying it outside of economics. In fact, most people are pretty bad at learning transfer – taking a concept from one area and applying it to another. And yet, it’s arguably one of the most important skills. Below, you’ll find a few examples of learning transfer in action, but please send others our way!

Sign me up!

A weekly email of 
media and questions tailored to what 
you’re teaching.


See a sample!

Sign up nowSee sample email
How it works

This is available to a limited number of beta users. Don't fret if you get waitlisted – we will let you know when we've got a slot for you!

How it works in 3 steps

Fill out the short form above. 

We'll reach out to gather your micro syllabus so we can tailor EconInbox to what you're teaching, when you're teaching it. 

We curate custom content for your micro class. 

We've searched high and low for resources that will engage your students: news articles with clicker questions, podcasts, videos, nerdy blog posts, games and more. Check out our working spreadsheet for details. 

You receive one weekly email.

You’ll receive a weekly email with vetted content matched to the topic you’re teaching that week, for free.

Count me in!

See a sample!

Check out a sample email!

Elasticity: Curated Media

News & Articles

Massive response to sale prompts Build-A-Bear to shut down lines, offer vouchers  
(CNN) 7/12/2018
The "overwhelming" response to a sale at Build-A-Bear prompted the retailer to turn away customers waiting in long lines outside its stores. Ask your students if they can infer anything about elasticity of demand.
Resources: 
Multiple Choice Questions

Most Netflix users would pay a lot more for their subscription, survey shows  
(Yahoo! Finance) 5/15/2018
Are your students addicted to Netflix? Then this example might resonate with them. While the headline is a bit misleading, you can use the information given in the article about demand at different price points to calculate (a rough) elasticity of demand for Netflix (FYI —  Netflix has around 125M subscribers). You could even create a poll for your class and construct the class’ elasticity of demand for Netflix for a more personal example.


Facts about (Facebook) Friends 
(Marginal Revolution) 7/25/2017
An oldie, but a goodie. Does distance make the heart grow fonder? Tyler Cowen provides some stats on social connectedness and links to a working paper on the topic. Transfer of learning, anyone?


Podcasts

An Economist Gets Stoned
(Planet Money)
What happens to the price of drugs if we legalize them? Well, it depends on elasticity of demand. For more background on the research in this episode, check out Jeffrey Miron’s paper on drug prohibition’s budgetary implications.
*No economists were stoned in the making of this podcast.

Resource: Rebecca Moryll has a class discussion question and a written assignment for this episode at audioecon.com.


Video

Characteristics that Determine Elasticity 
(MJM Foodie)
Using the example of gas to fuel her car, Dr. Mary J. McGlasson gives 

a quick overview of the contributing factors to whether an individual’s demand for a particular good might be elastic or inelastic. So, is Dr. McGlasson’s demand for gasoline elastic or inelastic?

Elasticity and Slave Redemption 
(MRU)
Slave redemption is one of the starkest examples of unintended consequences that we’ve ever heard of. It drives home the point for students that even when you’re trying to do good in the world, understanding economics, including elasticities, is crucial!



Hey Professor Thaler,


Welcome back to EconInbox — your weekly round-up of the best free and engaging econ teaching resources out there.

This week: elasticity. Students often have trouble with elasticity, especially applying it outside of economics. In fact, most people are pretty bad at learning transfer – taking a concept from one area and applying it to another. And yet, it’s arguably one of the most important skills. Below, you’ll find a few examples of learning transfer in action, but please send others our way!

Sign me up!Sign me up!

Have resources to share? We'd also love to hear any other comments you have!

Drop us an email at 

Have resources to share?
We'd also love to hear any other comments you have!

Drop us an email at 

A weekly email of media and activities tailored to what you’re teaching.

Ever seen your students light up when they discover the real-world applications of economics? Perhaps it was a timely news article or the perfect Planet Money episode. However, finding these great resources can be a bit like locating a needle in a haystack.

Good news! With the help of economics educators like you, we’ve scoured the web for the best econ teaching resources and, where possible, paired them with classroom activities.

We'll deliver these resources via a weekly email — full of news articles, videos, and podcasts customized to the topic you’re teaching that week. Just micro for now. 

econinbox@mruniversity.com

BETA

BETA

econinbox@mruniversity.com