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We curate custom content for your micro class. 

We've searched high and low for resources that will engage your students: news articles with clicker questions, podcasts, videos, nerdy blog posts, games and more. Check out our working spreadsheet for details. 

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You’ll receive a weekly email with vetted content matched to the topic you’re teaching that week, for free.

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Elasticity: Curated Media

News & Articles

Massive response to sale prompts Build-A-Bear to shut down lines, offer vouchers  
(CNN) 7/12/2018
The "overwhelming" response to a sale at Build-A-Bear prompted the retailer to turn away customers waiting in long lines outside its stores. Ask your students if they can infer anything about elasticity of demand.
Resources: 
Multiple Choice Questions

Most Netflix users would pay a lot more for their subscription, survey shows  
(Yahoo! Finance) 5/15/2018
Are your students addicted to Netflix? Then this example might resonate with them. While the headline is a bit misleading, you can use the information given in the article about demand at different price points to calculate (a rough) elasticity of demand for Netflix (FYI —  Netflix has around 125M subscribers). You could even create a poll for your class and construct the class’ elasticity of demand for Netflix for a more personal example.


Facts about (Facebook) Friends 
(Marginal Revolution) 7/25/2017
An oldie, but a goodie. Does distance make the heart grow fonder? Tyler Cowen provides some stats on social connectedness and links to a working paper on the topic. Transfer of learning, anyone?


Podcasts

An Economist Gets Stoned
(Planet Money)
What happens to the price of drugs if we legalize them? Well, it depends on elasticity of demand. For more background on the research in this episode, check out Jeffrey Miron’s paper on drug prohibition’s budgetary implications.
*No economists were stoned in the making of this podcast.

Resource: Rebecca Moryll has a class discussion question and a written assignment for this episode at audioecon.com.


Video

Characteristics that Determine Elasticity 
(MJM Foodie)
Using the example of gas to fuel her car, Dr. Mary J. McGlasson gives 

a quick overview of the contributing factors to whether an individual’s demand for a particular good might be elastic or inelastic. So, is Dr. McGlasson’s demand for gasoline elastic or inelastic?

Elasticity and Slave Redemption 
(MRU)
Slave redemption is one of the starkest examples of unintended consequences that we’ve ever heard of. It drives home the point for students that even when you’re trying to do good in the world, understanding economics, including elasticities, is crucial!



Hey Professor Smith,


Welcome back to EconInbox — your weekly round-up of the best free and engaging econ teaching resources out there.

This week: elasticity. Students often have trouble with elasticity, especially applying it outside of economics. In fact, most people are pretty bad at learning transfer – taking a concept from one area and applying it to another. And yet, it’s arguably one of the most important skills. Below, you’ll find a few examples of learning transfer in action, but please send others our way!

Sign me up!

Have resources to share?
We'd also love to hear any other comments you have!

Drop us an email at 

A weekly email of media and activities tailored to what you’re teaching.

econinbox@mruniversity.com

BETA

How it works

1. Sign up for EconInbox by 
giving us your Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, or Intro to Economics course schedule.

 

2. We sync tailored resources to your syllabus schedule.

3. You receive one weekly email of resources based on what you’re teaching that week.

What educators are saying about EconInbox

"I'm honored to say EconInbox is my best teaching assistant."

— Dr. Maryam Moeini, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences

"I am just so happy with EconInbox. It's been such a great resource - I've used it to improve my lectures, build better reading response questions, and inspire ideas. I look forward to it every week!"

— Dr. Emily Beam, University of Vermont

"EconInbox has been a fantastic aid to teaching AP Micro this year. This is my 7th year teaching and these resources have allowed me to change up my curriculum and have students make more real world connections than ever before."

— David Golden, Chicago Public Schools

MRU Video LibraryTerms of UseHigh School Teacher ResourcesUniversity Teacher Resources
Sample Email

Inflation: Curated Media

News

Inflation game
(Washington Post) 7/13/2021
Prices are up on average, but what is happening to prices for individual industries or items? Test your knowledge with this fun interactive. 

Resource: Practice Questions


Shrinkflation is the fad diet that no one needs 
(CNN) 7/25/2021
When the box of cereal shrinks, but the price doesn’t. For a more in-depth treatment, here’s a Planet Money newsletter on the same topic. 

Resource: Practice Questions


Inflation climbs higher than expected in June as price index rises 5.4% 
(CNBC) 7/13/2021
The most recent data on inflation. Prices rose higher than expected; used cars and trucks accounted for ⅓ of the total CPI increase. Here is a good list of those items driving up prices.



Inflation-stricken Venezuela rolls out larger banknotes  
(Reuters
) 3/16/2021
A note worth 500,000 bolivars is worth just 27 U.S. cents. The Venezuelan government plans to roll out a million bolivar note soon.



Pandemics upend traditional views of inflation  
(Bloomberg
) 8/26/2020
Fascinating discussion about how inflation was higher than it looked in the data during the pandemic because our quality of life has decreased. If we are paying roughly the same amount of money for a worse experience -did you enjoy going to the grocery store as much as before?–, inflation is increasing. (Note – this is an opinion piece!) Pairs well with this Bloomberg piece about what consumers are buying during the pandemic vs what the typical CPI basket looks like.


Podcasts

Crypto, Inflation, Housing, Cities and Talent with Tyler Cowen
(The James Altucher Show)
Wide-ranging conversation, but there’s an interesting discussion at 25ish minutes about creating your own deflation. Additional blog comments here. 


Shrinkflation: Inflation’s sneaky cousin
(The Indicator)
It’s the sneaky way to increase prices without increasing prices: shrink the size of the bag! Is your favorite consumer item shrinking in size?


The great inflation
(Planet Money)
Many of us take inflation for granted, but it’s a minor miracle that we’ve managed to curb inflation in the United States and other developed countries for such a long time. It wasn’t always like this. 


Video

What The Tooth Fairy Tells Us About The Rising Cost Of Parenting 
(Planet Money)
There’s no denying it- the price of a going baby tooth is increasing way faster than the inflation rate. Why is it such a good time to be a toothy kid? It all boils down to income elasticity of demand.  

Resource: Discussion Activity 


Measuring Inflation 
(MRU) EdPuzzle
What is inflation and how is it measured? This video explains it all. As an added bonus – students will get a tutorial on using FRED to obtain macroeconomic data.

Resource: Practice Questions




Additional Resources


Cost of Living Game
(Storyline)
Can you guess what price trends in the US look like? Find out with this trend guessing game. 


The Billion Prices Project
(MIT and Harvard)
Rather than relying just on CPI, this was a cool project that scraped data on billions of prices from all over the world to explore macroeconomics questions. 

 

Getting Graphic




























Interesting graph that examines how pre-pandemic, prices of services were rising faster than prices of goods. For more, see this article

Also, FRED is the go-to place for all macroeconomic indicators. Here’s the current CPI, percent change from a year ago (seasonally adjusted).


Hey Professor Nash,


Welcome back to EconInbox and another week of curated resources for teaching economics! This week: inflation.

Sign me up!

Copyright © 2021 Marginal Revolution University. All rights reserved.

Have resources to share?
We'd also love to hear any other comments you have!

Drop us an email at 

econinbox@mru.org
Sign up now

A weekly email of media and activities tailored to what you’re teaching.

Sign me up!
MRU Video LibraryTerms of UseHigh School Teacher ResourcesUniversity Teacher Resources

Copyright © 2021 Marginal Revolution University. All rights reserved.

Have resources to share? We'd also love to hear any other comments you have!

Drop us an email at 

econinbox@mru.org

What educators 
are saying about EconInbox

"I'm honored to say EconInbox is my best teaching assistant."

— Dr. Maryam Moeini, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences

"I am just so happy with EconInbox. It's been such a great resource - I've used it to improve my lectures, build better reading response questions, and inspire ideas. 
I look forward to it every week!"

— Dr. Emily Beam, University of Vermont

"EconInbox has been a fantastic aid to teaching AP Micro this year. This is my 7th year teaching and these resources have allowed me to change up my curriculum and have students make more real world connections than ever before."

— David Golden, Chicago Public Schools

How it works

1. Sign up for EconInbox by giving us your Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, or Intro to Economics course schedule. 

 

2. We sync tailored resources to your syllabus schedule.

3. You receive one weekly email of resources based on what you’re teaching that week.

Check out a 
sample email!

Elasticity: Curated Media

News

Inflation game
(Washington Post) 7/13/2021
Prices are up on average, but what is happening to prices for individual industries or items? Test your knowledge with this fun interactive. 

Resource: Practice Questions


Shrinkflation is the fad diet that no one needs 
(CNN) 7/25/2021
When the box of cereal shrinks, but the price doesn’t. For a more in-depth treatment, here’s a Planet Money newsletter on the same topic. 

Resource: Practice Questions


Inflation climbs higher than expected in June as price index rises 5.4% 
(CNBC) 7/13/2021
The most recent data on inflation. Prices rose higher than expected; used cars and trucks accounted for ⅓ of the total CPI increase. Here is a good list of those items driving up prices.



Inflation-stricken Venezuela rolls out larger banknotes  
(Reuters
) 3/16/2021
A note worth 500,000 bolivars is worth just 27 U.S. cents. The Venezuelan government plans to roll out a million bolivar note soon.



Pandemics upend traditional views of inflation  
(Bloomberg
) 8/26/2020
Fascinating discussion about how inflation was higher than it looked in the data during the pandemic because our quality of life has decreased. If we are paying roughly the same amount of money for a worse experience -did you enjoy going to the grocery store as much as before?–, inflation is increasing. (Note – this is an opinion piece!) Pairs well with this Bloomberg piece about what consumers are buying during the pandemic vs what the typical CPI basket looks like.


Podcasts

Crypto, Inflation, Housing, Cities and Talent with Tyler Cowen
(The James Altucher Show)
Wide-ranging conversation, but there’s an interesting discussion at 25ish minutes about creating your own deflation. Additional blog comments here. 


Shrinkflation: Inflation’s sneaky cousin
(The Indicator)
It’s the sneaky way to increase prices without increasing prices: shrink the size of the bag! Is your favorite consumer item shrinking in size?


The great inflation
(Planet Money)
Many of us take inflation for granted, but it’s a minor miracle that we’ve managed to curb inflation in the United States and other developed countries for such a long time. It wasn’t always like this. 



Video

What The Tooth Fairy Tells Us About The Rising Cost Of Parenting 
(Planet Money)
There’s no denying it- the price of a going baby tooth is increasing way faster than the inflation rate. Why is it such a good time to be a toothy kid? It all boils down to income elasticity of demand.  

Resource: Discussion Activity 


Measuring Inflation 
(MRU) EdPuzzle
What is inflation and how is it measured? This video explains it all. As an added bonus – students will get a tutorial on using FRED to obtain macroeconomic data.

Resource: Practice Questions


Additional Resources


Cost of Living Game
(Storyline)
Can you guess what price trends in the US look like? Find out with this trend guessing game. 


The Billion Prices Project
(MIT and Harvard)
Rather than relying just on CPI, this was a cool project that scraped data on billions of prices from all over the world to explore macroeconomics questions.  


Getting Graphic

















Interesting graph that examines how pre-pandemic, prices of services were rising faster than prices of goods. For more, see this article

Also, FRED is the go-to place for all macroeconomic indicators. Here’s the current CPI, percent change from a year ago (seasonally adjusted).


Hey Professor Romer,

Welcome back to EconInbox and another week of curated resources for teaching economics! This week: elasticity.

Sign me up!

by MRU

Sign me up!Sign me up!Sign me up!

FAQ

Sign me up!

How it works:

1. Signup for EconInbox by 
sharing your Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, or Intro to Economics course schedule. 


 

2. We sync tailored resources to your syllabus schedule.

3. You receive one weekly email of resources based on what you’re teaching that week. 
See sample email

FAQ

Sign me up!

1. Signup for EconInbox by sharing your Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, or Intro to Economics course schedule. 

 

2. We sync tailored resources to your syllabus schedule. 

3. You receive one weekly email of resources based on what you’re teaching that week. See sample email

How it works:

Q: It seems like I can only sign up for one course at a time. What if I teach multiple courses? 

A: Great question! We’re working on a better solution for this. In the meantime, sign up for one course and then simply add topics for both/multiple classes to that schedule. If you’ve already signed up for one course for fall and would like to add another course, you can 
update your schedule here. If you have any questions, just reach out to econinbox@mru.org and we’ll help you out.


Q: I really like the concept but I honestly don’t know my schedule for the whole semester. Can I still sign up? 

A: Absolutely! It’s ok if you’re not sure what you’re teaching. After you sign up and fill out the first few weeks, you can always return to EconInbox’s syllabus builder app throughout the semester to edit your schedule.


Q: It sounds like you’ll send me these cool resources the week before I teach it. What if I want them a bit earlier than that? 

A: No problem! We can adjust your schedule so you receive it two or three weeks in advance. Just let us know! Reach out to econinbox@mru.org
   




Q: It seems like I can only sign up for one course at a time. What if I teach multiple courses? 

A: Great question! We’re working on a better solution for this. In the meantime, sign up for one course and then simply add topics for both/multiple classes to that schedule. If you’ve already signed up for one course for fall and would like to add another course, you can update your schedule here. If you have any questions, just reach out to 
econinbox@mru.org and we’ll help you out.


Q: I really like the concept but I honestly don’t know my schedule for the whole semester. Can I still sign up? 

A: Absolutely! It’s ok if you’re not sure what you’re teaching. After you sign up and fill out the first few weeks, you can always return to EconInbox’s syllabus builder app throughout the semester to edit your schedule.


Q: It sounds like you’ll send me these cool resources the week before I teach it. What if I want them a bit earlier than that? 

A: No problem! We can adjust your schedule so you receive it two or three weeks in advance. Just let us know! Reach out to econinbox@mru.org